How to make £60 Amazon voucher a year by uploading receipts

I’ve recently discovered an amazing app, whereby you can make £60 a year by uploading receipts! How easy and simple is that? In this quick and easy guide, I’ll introduce you to SnapMyEats, how it works and how you can get earning! Let me know if you give it a try.

The Frugal Frenchie

What is SnapMyEats?

SnapMyEats is an app that asks you three questions and a picture of a receipt, in exchange for points towards Amazon vouchers.

How to make £60 Amazon voucher a year by uploading receipts

Is there a catch?

There is absolutely no catch, I got paid myself last month after trying it out for the first time ever!

Furthermore, they keep you updated on your progress before you upload a receipt, to show that they keep track and aren’t “scamming” you out of any. Invalid receipts mean anything that’s out of date. Continue reading “How to make £60 Amazon voucher a year by uploading receipts”

Goals for 2019

For the first time ever last year, I reached all my goals for 2018. I strongly attribute this to writing them down, as well as an update, in order to keep me accountable. Now, with exams out the way, I thought I’d write down my goals for 2019 too.

The Frugal Frenchie

Goals for 2019

Decluttering

This is probably my most recent goal, having only decided on this one around the second week in. For once, I may just about be on trend, as I have just binged watched “Tidying Up” with Marie Kondo. I’ve never watched a show that taught me so much, yet seemed so obvious at the same time.

The before and after pictures really spoke to me, as normally we just see these gorgeous homes on Instagram, but never expect that how it started off could resemble our own homes. Her teachings about sparking joy and detaching our memories from objects, really spoke to me as although I am not a materialistic person, all of my belongings I feel must be kept for sentimental reasons.

As a result, one goal is to declutter my room, to the extent of imagining “this is what I would bring if I moved house.” If I wouldn’t bring it to a new home, why would I keep it in my old one? Up to now, I’ve already cleared out some clothes, and I would like to keep updating on my Instagram I did here. Continue reading “Goals for 2019”

My dissertation on the impact of maternal mental health

As many of you know I currently study a BSc in Psychology. I am in my final year and (all things going well) should graduate in June 2019. This obviously means that I am working on my dissertation, so I thought I’d share a little bit about it, especially as it’s something that impacts a lot of women today and is something that needs to be spoken out about. I hope you find it as interesting as I do!

The Frugal Frenchie

Edit: If you would like to participate, click on the link here

My dissertation on the impact of maternal mental health

My topic and why I chose it

I’ve decided to do my dissertation on postnatal OCD, more specifically on what, if any impact there is on infant attachment type. There are a few reasons for this:

  1. I am a very maternal person, I love hearing about their behaviour and what they get up to- I mean most people I follow on Instagram are very active mums who love putting stories up!
  2. Maternal, or parental health in general needs to be further researched, but I found that particularly postnatal OCD lacked insight. Perhaps this was a matter of there are fewer people diagnosed or not many people chose to focus on it in their research- I have no clue. I just thought for my personal interest, and in the interest of adding something of value to the academic field, I thought I would focus on postnatal OCD.

Continue reading “My dissertation on the impact of maternal mental health”

An update on my goals for 2018

With it now being the middle of the year, I thought it’d be a good time to give you an update on my goals for 2018. If you haven’t read the initial post, you can read it here, if not, I’ll get started; enjoy!

The Frugal Frenchie

In terms of the socialising aspect, I feel (for me) I’ve done pretty well! I’ve gone on two outings with my colleagues, I’ve met up with friends a few times – one of which I hadn’t seen in two years- and I met new people when I went for a photoshoot a few days ago. That’s compared to last year where the most socialising I did, was going downstairs and hanging out with my housemates for a few hours.

An update on my goals for 2018

This is a mid goal I’m going to give to myself though, take more pictures! Of all those outings, I only have one picture and I even went to a wedding yesterday and only took one of my boyfriend and I. I always think about pictures and want to take them, but I always feel awkward for asking… any tips for getting over that? I have barely any memories and regret it every time!

Concerning the blog, I feel like I have been making more of an effort. I still need to work on consistency, but I feel like my following has grown a decent amount. I’ve hosted two giveaways, written and received guest posts and I’m still working towards my first ever sponsored post.

I think the biggest difference towards blogging is my “mindset.” Continue reading “An update on my goals for 2018”

Top 5 money lessons to know before graduating

We don’t learn about money in university, or in younger education at that. It’s sad but it’s true – no one teaches us how to pay taxes, how to budget and what a mortgage is. And yet, money is essential! No matter what career you get into, you’ll be earning a salary and using money to buy food, transport, etc.

So if the schools won’t teach us, we need to teach ourselves. Based on the several months I’ve been working and researching with Financially Mint, here are the top 5 money lessons you need to know before graduating.

Top 5 money lessons to know before graduating

1. Money is just a tool

My life changed when I realised I didn’t have to spend my entire life working for money at a job I didn’t like just to pay the bills and have a roof over my head.

Money is your tool to live how you want. You are the one who chooses what to do with it. If you want to use it to travel the world, that’s on you. If you want to use it on going out every weekend, that’s also on you. It’s about making priorities and deciding what you really want. Once you understand that, you realise that money is just a tool to achieve your goals and dreams; what you really need is willpower and a desire to do better.

And the key to making sure you use your money correctly is financial education – what we’re not taught in schools. Learning how to invest, how to start a side-hustle, how to save money. These are things we need to learn by ourselves, and the more we study them the better we get at it. So get started in college!

2. Invest, invest, invest

The key to growing your wealth: investing.

Investing is stowing away your money somewhere safe and watching it grow. It’s starting off with £500 and seeing it grow to £100,000 over 20 years. It’s what lets people retire early and always have cash for emergencies.

If you don’t want to start investing in college (check my how to get started in uni post), I recommend at least learning the basics and preparing for investing once you graduate. Invest into low fee index funds and put away some money every month. Watch your money grow into something useable for the future: a car, a house, retirement, etc.

Investing is one of the pillars of financial education, so I recommend every student to get started as soon as possible.

Top 5 money lessons to know before graduating

3. Control is key

Control means knowing where your money is and what it’s doing at all times. It means not having a heart attack every time you open your bank account (it happens) and it means knowing where to put your money once you get your paycheck.

This starts with a nice and simple budget. In my 6 day course, that The Frugal Frenchie has reviewed, we go back to the basics of budgeting: allocating your money to the right expenses and making sure you reach your ambitions/goals.

Being in control of your money outflows and inflows before graduating will make your entry into the workforce so much easier. You won’t have a pressure to get a job immediately (Emergency fund to the rescue!), you’ll know what kind of salary you’re looking for and you’ll know exactly where to put your money every month.

4. Don’t be in debt

Debt can good and can be bad. But when it’s bad, it’s pretty bad. The bad debt: credit card debt and payday loans. As a student, you hopefully will have very little debt (student loans are a separate case), and you really want to keep it that way. Credit card debt accumulates and will get more expensive every time – pay off all your debt and make sure you know what you’re doing if you take on any more debt.

Student loans are another story altogether. In fact, they’re so different that some people prefer calling your student loan debt a contribution, simply because the situation is so particular. Before graduating, take a look at your student loans and decide whether you want to pay them off. This post on Should I pay off my student loans? will give you an idea of how to make a decision and plan appropriately. And as always, do your research.  

Top 5 money lessons to know before graduating

5. Pay yourself first

The best part of the budget: yourself.

This means allocating a certain percentage of your income to yourself, to your goals. And you can start this in college: the minute you get your paycheck/loan/money each month, allocate 15% to your goals, to your emergency fund, to your debts. That 15% is what will get you out of the rat race, out of living from paycheck to paycheck.

If you start paying yourself first in college you will actually be prepared for adult life (shock horror). You’ll be way more flexible and really be able to pick the job you want – because you’ll have an emergency fund, you’ll be debt free and will have the motivation to keep working on your goals.

Again, this starts with the mighty budget. At the time of calculating your budget from your income, the first thing you do is allocate that 15% to ‘Savings’. And then the rest is for your expenses! No need to worry about saving up more.

Understanding these 5 lessons on money will get you prepared for the world after graduation. Heck, it’ll even get you excited – you understand that you don’t have to be stuck at a job you just tolerate, you can achieve that flexibility to help you find the job that works best for. It all starts with being in control and financially educated.

Review: Free finance course for students

Through my old money blog, I have made friends with other money bloggers and learnt so much through them. Recently, my friend Araminta from “Financially Mint,” has put her financial knowledge into a super helpful, FREE, 6-day course. As it has an emphasis on helping and teaching students, I thought it would be a great idea (for my benefit too) to try it out and give you a review!

The Frugal Frenchie

Day One: Planning

In day one of this email course, you’re encouraged to create a plan and set goals for yourself. Emails across the next few days will guide you and give you ideas on how you can reach those goals!Review: Free finance course for students

Day Two: Lower Spending and Budgeting

To get you started, one of the most commonly used words in finance – budgeting- is covered. Why is it important? What can it tell you? Araminta also shows you, through pictures and instructions, how you can keep track of your expenses, savings, debt, income and how to set a budget.

A big emphasis is placed on cutting down your unnecessary spending, and if not possible, Araminta has you covered with a guide to student discounts as well as a long list of available ones out there!

Day Three: Increasing your Income

I love how this course is catered to students. It’s always annoying when people assume you can just get a full-time job or something of a higher wage, we’re students! It’s not always possible!

Catering to this, day three of the course gives you several options for side hustles that you can manage alongside your studies, as well as a clear guide to helping you get started on each one. They’re super easy and really well explained- so don’t worry if it’s all new to you.Review: Free finance course for students

Day Four: Pay Off Debt

As I personally have no debt, bar student fees (I didn’t take out a maintenance loan), day four was really interesting for me. I learnt about interest and how potential payments could be made in future, and how to get your head around it. There were also some helpful tools attached to the email such you can try calculating a future payment plan for yourself.

Day Five: The Savings

You’ll see that throughout the first few days, there will be a continuous mention of “15% in your savings account.” This is explained in more detailed at the beginning of the budgeting email, so make sure you go back to it and understand that before day five!

In this email, there are heaps of good ideas on what to do with your savings. This includes investing ideas (with case study examples), with some relevant articles and resources and then explaining what a “FU Fund” is and why it’s beneficial to have one.Review: Free finance course for students

Day Six: Financial Education and Resources

The last day of the course is helping you to continue to grow your financial education. There is a free resource pack available through “Financially Mint,” as well as a list of other places you might grow your knowledge from.  Once you start budgeting more seriously than just on pen and paper, this email has you covered with some great recommendations for budgeting apps that you can try and have a whizz at.

Overall, as you can imagine, I found this course extremely interesting and above all, very helpful. If you’ve never really thought about your finances or don’t know where to start, it’s ever so helpful having tonnes of information in 6 clear, consecutive emails.

If you’d like to join the course, simply click here and let me know what you thought afterwards!