How to make £60 Amazon voucher a year by uploading receipts

I’ve recently discovered an amazing app, whereby you can make £60 a year by uploading receipts! How easy and simple is that? In this quick and easy guide, I’ll introduce you to SnapMyEats, how it works and how you can get earning! Let me know if you give it a try.

The Frugal Frenchie

What is SnapMyEats?

SnapMyEats is an app that asks you three questions and a picture of a receipt, in exchange for points towards Amazon vouchers.

How to make £60 Amazon voucher a year by uploading receipts

Is there a catch?

There is absolutely no catch, I got paid myself last month after trying it out for the first time ever!

Furthermore, they keep you updated on your progress before you upload a receipt, to show that they keep track and aren’t “scamming” you out of any. Invalid receipts mean anything that’s out of date. Continue reading “How to make £60 Amazon voucher a year by uploading receipts”

Goals for 2019

For the first time ever last year, I reached all my goals for 2018. I strongly attribute this to writing them down, as well as an update, in order to keep me accountable. Now, with exams out the way, I thought I’d write down my goals for 2019 too.

The Frugal Frenchie

Goals for 2019

Decluttering

This is probably my most recent goal, having only decided on this one around the second week in. For once, I may just about be on trend, as I have just binged watched “Tidying Up” with Marie Kondo. I’ve never watched a show that taught me so much, yet seemed so obvious at the same time.

The before and after pictures really spoke to me, as normally we just see these gorgeous homes on Instagram, but never expect that how it started off could resemble our own homes. Her teachings about sparking joy and detaching our memories from objects, really spoke to me as although I am not a materialistic person, all of my belongings I feel must be kept for sentimental reasons.

As a result, one goal is to declutter my room, to the extent of imagining “this is what I would bring if I moved house.” If I wouldn’t bring it to a new home, why would I keep it in my old one? Up to now, I’ve already cleared out some clothes, and I would like to keep updating on my Instagram I did here. Continue reading “Goals for 2019”

My dissertation on the impact of maternal mental health

As many of you know I currently study a BSc in Psychology. I am in my final year and (all things going well) should graduate in June 2019. This obviously means that I am working on my dissertation, so I thought I’d share a little bit about it, especially as it’s something that impacts a lot of women today and is something that needs to be spoken out about. I hope you find it as interesting as I do!

The Frugal Frenchie

Edit: If you would like to participate, click on the link here

My dissertation on the impact of maternal mental health

My topic and why I chose it

I’ve decided to do my dissertation on postnatal OCD, more specifically on what, if any impact there is on infant attachment type. There are a few reasons for this:

  1. I am a very maternal person, I love hearing about their behaviour and what they get up to- I mean most people I follow on Instagram are very active mums who love putting stories up!
  2. Maternal, or parental health in general needs to be further researched, but I found that particularly postnatal OCD lacked insight. Perhaps this was a matter of there are fewer people diagnosed or not many people chose to focus on it in their research- I have no clue. I just thought for my personal interest, and in the interest of adding something of value to the academic field, I thought I would focus on postnatal OCD.

Continue reading “My dissertation on the impact of maternal mental health”

How to save money at university

University is an expensive venture, from the tuition fees themselves to living costs and the repayment of maintenance loans… so here are a few tips on how to save money at university. Hope they help!

The Frugal Frenchie

Education tips

  • University books: the books they may quote as “indicative references” may not actually be essential. If they are, before forking out, why not check your library first, eBay or even if any university selling pages
  • Amazon Prime Student: not only can you get a 6-month trial, but you can also save 10% on thousands of textbooks!

Food tips

  • Meal plan: as you’re only feeding yourself, you can plan your meals in advance to avoid food waste and over-snacking. Another benefit is that you could buy certain ingredients that are cheap in bulk and use them for several meals. A great example would be potatoes as you can make mash or jacket potato etc.
  • Freeze leftovers: self-explanatory really, we’ve all made that mistake of making too much food for one meal. Why not freeze it and save it for another day?

How to save money at university Continue reading “How to save money at university”

Top 5 money lessons to know before graduating

We don’t learn about money in university, or in younger education at that. It’s sad but it’s true – no one teaches us how to pay taxes, how to budget and what a mortgage is. And yet, money is essential! No matter what career you get into, you’ll be earning a salary and using money to buy food, transport, etc.

So if the schools won’t teach us, we need to teach ourselves. Based on the several months I’ve been working and researching with Financially Mint, here are the top 5 money lessons you need to know before graduating.

Top 5 money lessons to know before graduating

1. Money is just a tool

My life changed when I realised I didn’t have to spend my entire life working for money at a job I didn’t like just to pay the bills and have a roof over my head.

Money is your tool to live how you want. You are the one who chooses what to do with it. If you want to use it to travel the world, that’s on you. If you want to use it on going out every weekend, that’s also on you. It’s about making priorities and deciding what you really want. Once you understand that, you realise that money is just a tool to achieve your goals and dreams; what you really need is willpower and a desire to do better.

And the key to making sure you use your money correctly is financial education – what we’re not taught in schools. Learning how to invest, how to start a side-hustle, how to save money. These are things we need to learn by ourselves, and the more we study them the better we get at it. So get started in college!

2. Invest, invest, invest

The key to growing your wealth: investing.

Investing is stowing away your money somewhere safe and watching it grow. It’s starting off with £500 and seeing it grow to £100,000 over 20 years. It’s what lets people retire early and always have cash for emergencies.

If you don’t want to start investing in college (check my how to get started in uni post), I recommend at least learning the basics and preparing for investing once you graduate. Invest into low fee index funds and put away some money every month. Watch your money grow into something useable for the future: a car, a house, retirement, etc.

Investing is one of the pillars of financial education, so I recommend every student to get started as soon as possible.

Top 5 money lessons to know before graduating

3. Control is key

Control means knowing where your money is and what it’s doing at all times. It means not having a heart attack every time you open your bank account (it happens) and it means knowing where to put your money once you get your paycheck.

This starts with a nice and simple budget. In my 6 day course, that The Frugal Frenchie has reviewed, we go back to the basics of budgeting: allocating your money to the right expenses and making sure you reach your ambitions/goals.

Being in control of your money outflows and inflows before graduating will make your entry into the workforce so much easier. You won’t have a pressure to get a job immediately (Emergency fund to the rescue!), you’ll know what kind of salary you’re looking for and you’ll know exactly where to put your money every month.

4. Don’t be in debt

Debt can good and can be bad. But when it’s bad, it’s pretty bad. The bad debt: credit card debt and payday loans. As a student, you hopefully will have very little debt (student loans are a separate case), and you really want to keep it that way. Credit card debt accumulates and will get more expensive every time – pay off all your debt and make sure you know what you’re doing if you take on any more debt.

Student loans are another story altogether. In fact, they’re so different that some people prefer calling your student loan debt a contribution, simply because the situation is so particular. Before graduating, take a look at your student loans and decide whether you want to pay them off. This post on Should I pay off my student loans? will give you an idea of how to make a decision and plan appropriately. And as always, do your research.  

Top 5 money lessons to know before graduating

5. Pay yourself first

The best part of the budget: yourself.

This means allocating a certain percentage of your income to yourself, to your goals. And you can start this in college: the minute you get your paycheck/loan/money each month, allocate 15% to your goals, to your emergency fund, to your debts. That 15% is what will get you out of the rat race, out of living from paycheck to paycheck.

If you start paying yourself first in college you will actually be prepared for adult life (shock horror). You’ll be way more flexible and really be able to pick the job you want – because you’ll have an emergency fund, you’ll be debt free and will have the motivation to keep working on your goals.

Again, this starts with the mighty budget. At the time of calculating your budget from your income, the first thing you do is allocate that 15% to ‘Savings’. And then the rest is for your expenses! No need to worry about saving up more.

Understanding these 5 lessons on money will get you prepared for the world after graduation. Heck, it’ll even get you excited – you understand that you don’t have to be stuck at a job you just tolerate, you can achieve that flexibility to help you find the job that works best for. It all starts with being in control and financially educated.

My future plans

Several conversations with my younger colleagues at Primark, who felt stuck and unsure about their futures, made me realise how fortunate I am to know what career I’d like to pursue. I can appreciate this isn’t the case for everyone, so I thought I would share my future plans with you. Who knows, they might give you some ideas!

I thought I’d start with a little educational background. So for GCSEs, I was very much language orientated, taking Dutch and French early, and also completing Spanish and German GCSE at the normal time in year 11. I also had a big passion for history and apparently, was very good at religious studies!

At that point I believe, I was keen on pursuing a career in law. At the time, being in a grammar school, where the “norm” was wanting to be a doctor or lawyer, it was clear where that influence came from. Unfortunately, in my school, psychology was not an option at GCSE level, so I never gave it two thoughts, as I had no idea what it entailed etc.

My future plans

When A-level came around, I had restricted my choices to psychology, French and German, alongside an EPQ. I had dropped my lawyer idea, as I realised it didn’t suit my personality or passions, but psychology was what I wanted to pursue at university. The two languages were just something to fit my strengths I guess!

Fast forward two years, and I’m now only about 14 months away from graduating. I know what I want to do as a career now, but I’m unsure what to do after I graduate. The benefits of having a BSc in Psychology is that it opens a countless number of doors; some go into advertising, health, education, clinical… even work with the police force! Although I have a passion for many areas of psychology, I think my past work experiences and my personal qualities would suit working with children.

My future plans

Of course, the first thought then is educational psychology. However, I wanted to make more of an impact on children’s lives than an education psychologist role would allow me to do. I thus decided that a teacher would be the perfect role for me. Teach multiple children at once, always be kept busy, learn day by day and keep my days varies (plus, have you seen the length of the holidays???).

Here’s my debate, however. After graduation, I’m not sure whether to do a master’s degree, just in case I decide a teacher isn’t for me and want to keep my options open, or should I go straight away into a teacher conversion degree so I can start working a.s.a.p? I think a masters would be helpful to have, however, I don’t see myself disliking being a teacher or getting bored of it. Would it end up being a “waste” of money and not particularly beneficial to my future or employability chances or would it do the opposite?

My future plans

That’s what I’m currently debating, but I hope something will happen between that time that makes the decision easier for me. In the meantime, I better start deciding what to write my dissertation on!

What would you like to do in the future? Or is what you’re doing now in line with what you wanted to do when you were younger? Let me know in the comments!

The Frugal Frenchie