How to save money on your wedding day

If you’re engaged to be wed, wow congratulations! If you’re here just to be curious, hey I don’t blame you either (let’s face it, I’m not married).                    The cost of weddings can often put people off the idea, or make them wait longer than they have to. The truth is, this isn’t necessary and you don’t need to downsize either, you just need these tips on how to save money on your wedding day!

The Frugal Frenchie

The timing of your wedding

  • Consider a midweek wedding/ out of season

Upon doing research on this, I found that some couples saved up to £7000 hosting a wedding in winter instead of summer, or saving £1000 because it was a Wednesday instead of a Saturday.

Business is slower during the week and the colder seasons, so it’s always worth seeing where they offer better deals for that.

  • Get last minute deals if you can’t wait!

Sites such as Last Minute Weddings, allow you to see last minute cancellations or nearby dates at great prices. They have selected venues but you can find decently priced packages and without the 1-2 year waiting list.

Other websites that are similar include Cancelled Weddings and For Better For Worse.

The bigger details

  • The location

A lot of the time our dream wedding consists of a castle-looking splendour, but sometimes the smaller, more modest countryside locations can be an utter bargain.

Barns can be transformed into really beautiful locations, or even a friend’s farm. YouTubers “The Life of Riley,” actually made a video about what they did- their whole wedding was only £4000!

I often hear of a lot of places in Scotland being very budget friendly, one couple I spoke to on Facebook during my research hired their whole venue for only £700!

How to save money on your wedding day Continue reading “How to save money on your wedding day”

What is there to know about Fathers’ mental health?

In a society where we’re (rightfully so) encouraging men to be expressive, not hide their feelings or reinforce this “macho” image, what is there to know about fathers’ mental health? Or perhaps more appropriate to ask, what do we know about their mental health? In this post, I shall be exploring exactly that. If you have any thoughts, just leave them in the comments below!

The Frugal Frenchie

What to know about Fathers' mental health?

Father’s supportive role

When having a baby, we often hear about maternal mental health, over paternal mental health. Of course, having a baby is a massive deal, and some women do develop perinatal mental health issues, but this isn’t to say that the Father can be mentally affected too.

In a study by Hanzak (2016), they asked Mother’s who had experienced maternal mental illnesses, how much their partner was able to help. The answers were mixed. Some said their partners were unhelpful, accounting their symptoms for just regular “postnatal” feelings or just saying “I’m tired too.” Others were unsure of how to help but they tried the best they could. They often didn’t have the resources and struggled to cope. Other Mothers were more positive and said that they stopped working and helped with the baby, managed to bond and was extremely patient.
Continue reading “What is there to know about Fathers’ mental health?”

My dissertation on the impact of maternal mental health

As many of you know I currently study a BSc in Psychology. I am in my final year and (all things going well) should graduate in June 2019. This obviously means that I am working on my dissertation, so I thought I’d share a little bit about it, especially as it’s something that impacts a lot of women today and is something that needs to be spoken out about. I hope you find it as interesting as I do!

The Frugal Frenchie

Edit: If you would like to participate, click on the link here

My dissertation on the impact of maternal mental health

My topic and why I chose it

I’ve decided to do my dissertation on postnatal OCD, more specifically on what, if any impact there is on infant attachment type. There are a few reasons for this:

  1. I am a very maternal person, I love hearing about their behaviour and what they get up to- I mean most people I follow on Instagram are very active mums who love putting stories up!
  2. Maternal, or parental health in general needs to be further researched, but I found that particularly postnatal OCD lacked insight. Perhaps this was a matter of there are fewer people diagnosed or not many people chose to focus on it in their research- I have no clue. I just thought for my personal interest, and in the interest of adding something of value to the academic field, I thought I would focus on postnatal OCD.

Continue reading “My dissertation on the impact of maternal mental health”

How to survive long distance relationships

Trying to survive long distance relationships can be difficult. If you don’t have the means or time to see each other often, it can really form a strain. My boyfriend and I have had our share of experiences with this and my ex actually lived in France, so I’m hoping these little tips that helped me, can be useful for you too.

Social media

Nowadays, everyone is on social media but there are some particular features that can really help in a relationship. Skype or Facebook calls, in particular, are great, as it allows you to make voice or video calls for free. It’s easy to just chat online, but face to face adds that more personal touch and when you’re feeling down, hearing your partner’s voice can be exactly what you need!

Love letters

Although technology does us a million favours from easing uni research to allowing us to email people from around the world, it has slightly ruined the romance between communication. If you have a penpal, you may understand the excitement of waiting for a letter or the even bigger surprise and receiving an unexpected one! Letters can be a great way to make your partner’s day, especially if there’s a time difference and it means you can’t often communicate “live.”

Talk of the future

I remember when my boyfriend and I were feeling particularly down and in need of company, talking of the future would often cheer us up. Just speaking of plans for next you see each other, or where you would love to go on holiday together etc. If you’re older, then maybe fantasise about where you’d want to get married etc. it really does add that buzz and romance to a relationship.

Learn about each other’s schedule

This might sound a little possessive, but I think it can mean a lot to the other person. It’s like the parent equivalent of “how did X go,” except you’re flattered they remembered and you want to tell them all about it. It’s often hard to do when you’re not living with each other but that little extra effort sure will be appreciated. It’s a very coupley thing to do and it can make your relationship that much stronger!

Doing similar things

You might be thinking “oh no that’s just as sickly as wearing matching clothes,” but it’s actually quite a fun and an engaging idea for you and your partner. Having something you can relate to or motivate each other over, will add a little variety to the everyday conversations and liven things up a bit! It doesn’t have to be a hobby or skill, it could be a joint project or allocating roles for a certain event you have coming up. Be creative and see what you can come up with!

These are just a few ideas of many. Do you use any other tricks? What did you find helpful? Let me know in the comments below!

The Frugal Frenchie x