The Ultimate Money Saving Guide for Parents

I am all for money saving, but sometimes I  feel like money saving posts are always designed towards students? Not sure if others feel this way… anyway, I thought I’d do a different post, where you could find loads of money saving apps and freebies for parents all in one place. Hope this ultimate money saving guide for parents is useful for you!

The Frugal Frenchie

Baby clubs

Many shops and companies have apps to go alongside their “baby clubs.” Not only do they sometimes provide you with freebies, it’s also a great way to get first knowledge of sales, coupons and access to private events.

My Mothercare – advantages include:

  • £100 worth of discount vouchers
  • Early access to their sales
  • Exclusive events instore outside of opening hours
  • 20% off maternity clothing
  • 24/7 medical advice

The Ultimate Money Saving Guide for Parents

Tesco Baby Club – advantages include:

  • Offers specifically aimed for your baby’s age  
  • Told about sales in advance
  • Competitions  

Boots Parenting Club – you need an advantage card to join up. Advantages include:

  • Free Boots magazines
  • 10 advantages points for every £1 spent on baby items (higher than the normal “rate”)
  • The possibility of free gifts
  • Coupons

Continue reading “The Ultimate Money Saving Guide for Parents”

Why young children can’t lie

As many of you may know, I study a BSc at Bournemouth University. Lately, we have been learning about developmental psychology- which I have to say has been one of my favourite topics so far! I learnt something interesting the other day, which I thought I would share with you all: why young children can’t lie? And why can they learn to do so later on?

The Frugal Frenchie

The answer can be found in a child’s theory of mind. The theory of mind is essentially the ability to realise that not everybody believes, desires and feels the same way you do (Premack & Woodruff, 1978). It’s also useful for predicting and explaining other people’s behaviours and allowing us to be empathic.

Theory of mind develops gradually throughout childhood, which means that some children may be at higher or more developed levels of theory of mind than others.

Why young children can't lie

Here are some examples to show you what I mean:

  • 3-4 months: social perception
    • You may be surprised, but here, children can already start showing signs of theory of mind.
    • They are capable of following another person’s gaze, which shows that they are aware of what other’s are looking at and that it’s not the same as them
  • 12 months: social referencing
    • For those of you with children, let me know in the comments if you’ve noticed this around this age!
    • An experiment called the visual cliff, shows this clearly
      • A child will make a judgement or a decision, based on the reactions of others
  • 12-18 months: intentions
    • In experiments, children around this age started to understand peoples’ intentions
      • E.g. When an experimenter was trying but failing to put a key on a hook, the child would do it correctly, rather than imitating the experimenter, as they instead their intention (Meltzhoff, 1995)

As you can see, the development is slow at first, but when children they get older, they’ll start to show obvious signs for the consideration of others, such as pretend play with toys, or showing empathy.

Why young children can't lie

Before this point, however, children are unable to understand that others know different facts or think different things. If a child knows that they stole the biscuits or drew crayon on the wall, they will assume that the parent will know this too, so they cannot lie.

Those tricksy puppets…. in an experiment by Peskin (1992), they asked 3-5 year olds, with a friendly puppet, what their favourite sticker was. Of course, with no motive to lie, they told the truth. The children were then told that a naughty puppet would come along and steal their favourite sticker. Sadly, when the naughty puppet asked the 3 (and 50% of the 4) year olds, their lack of theory of mind showed, as they told the naughty puppet their favourite sticker and it got stolen.

So there we have it! After the ages of around 3 years old, children can start to lie as their theory of mind becomes more developed, and they realise that you don’t know everything they do!

What do you think? Is this surprising? Let me know your thoughts!

Talking about my job at Primark

After my previous post explaining how I got to my current job, I thought I would follow it up by talking about my new job at Primark, including my roles and what I like/dislike about it.

Talking about my job at Primark

My official contracted job role in Primark is that I am a customer service representative. I was surprised that they put me there to be honest as I have never had any retail experience beforehand but after trying many different roles in the store during overtime, I definitely know that that’s where “I belong.”

My roles in customer service are quite vast actually. We have lots of small tasks to do, but we always have to do them simultaneously so when there’s a queue forming and we’re busy, it can end up being quite challenging. Our tasks are as follows:

Returning items

Exchanges with receipt

Exchanges without receipt

Hanging or folding all clothing we receive

Putting all other items in 25 different categories

Answering the phone and receiving instore and out-of-store calls

Making all the tannoy announcements

Going to the stock room and doing price enquiries

Arriving an hour early on Sunday’s at clearing the rails on the shop floor

In charge of lost property

In charge of staff purchases

In charge of donating things to charity or deciding whether they need to be disposed of

*Just realised that looks like a Christmas tree shape*

Talking about my job at Primark

As you can see, we really are kept on our toes. It can be stressful but there’s always something to be done and there’s never a dull moment. I also like it for the fact that I can talk to customers or more colleague as we go. Often in department work, you’re given a whole section by yourself and you spend the whole shift sorting or folding clothes with little interaction whereas, in customer service, we can hang clothes up and sort items while having a good little gossip or chat!

Don’t get me wrong though, there are some definite disadvantages. We can often get displeased customers, impatient customers, or some customers that aren’t considerate of the queue forming behind us and kick up an unneeded fuss. Oh, and we the departments certainly don’t hesitate when phoning us to do tannoys!

With that being said, I have done a lot of overtime this month, in all different areas of the store, but I’m sure that customer service is the place for me. I love interacting with customers and the challenge of multitasking combined with a good bit of socialising!

Do you enjoy your job? What does yours entail?

The Frugal Frenchie x