How to save money on your wedding day

If you’re engaged to be wed, wow congratulations! If you’re here just to be curious, hey I don’t blame you either (let’s face it, I’m not married).                    The cost of weddings can often put people off the idea, or make them wait longer than they have to. The truth is, this isn’t necessary and you don’t need to downsize either, you just need these tips on how to save money on your wedding day!

The Frugal Frenchie

The timing of your wedding

  • Consider a midweek wedding/ out of season

Upon doing research on this, I found that some couples saved up to £7000 hosting a wedding in winter instead of summer, or saving £1000 because it was a Wednesday instead of a Saturday.

Business is slower during the week and the colder seasons, so it’s always worth seeing where they offer better deals for that.

  • Get last minute deals if you can’t wait!

Sites such as Last Minute Weddings, allow you to see last minute cancellations or nearby dates at great prices. They have selected venues but you can find decently priced packages and without the 1-2 year waiting list.

Other websites that are similar include Cancelled Weddings and For Better For Worse.

The bigger details

  • The location

A lot of the time our dream wedding consists of a castle-looking splendour, but sometimes the smaller, more modest countryside locations can be an utter bargain.

Barns can be transformed into really beautiful locations, or even a friend’s farm. YouTubers “The Life of Riley,” actually made a video about what they did- their whole wedding was only £4000!

I often hear of a lot of places in Scotland being very budget friendly, one couple I spoke to on Facebook during my research hired their whole venue for only £700!

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Cheaper Fitbit alternatives

A few days ago, my boyfriend’s dad took part in the World’s Toughest Tough Mudder in Atlanta, Georgia. That, and the fact that people are going to be getting more and more health conscious in the new year, I thought it’d be a good idea to talk about 5 cheaper Fitbit alternatives. Perhaps this might make a good gift too?

The Frugal Frenchie

I decided to look into Fitbits just out of curiosity and I didn’t realise how expensive they were! I was shocked to find out that some are over £250; total put-off to exercise in my opinion. So, to help you out, I’ve compiled this list below:

MiFit products

The different MiFit products by Xiaomi are a good place to turn to for a cheaper alternative.

 

This model, in particular, is the Mi Smart Band 2. It’s water-resistant as well as Bluetooth operated. It has similar functions to a FitBit such as detection of sleep quality, monitoring heart rate, showing steps etc. but it’s only a fraction of the price!

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The Ultimate Money Saving Guide for Parents

I am all for money saving, but sometimes I  feel like money saving posts are always designed towards students? Not sure if others feel this way… anyway, I thought I’d do a different post, where you could find loads of money saving apps and freebies for parents all in one place. Hope this ultimate money saving guide for parents is useful for you!

The Frugal Frenchie

Baby clubs

Many shops and companies have apps to go alongside their “baby clubs.” Not only do they sometimes provide you with freebies, it’s also a great way to get first knowledge of sales, coupons and access to private events.

My Mothercare – advantages include:

  • £100 worth of discount vouchers
  • Early access to their sales
  • Exclusive events instore outside of opening hours
  • 20% off maternity clothing
  • 24/7 medical advice

The Ultimate Money Saving Guide for Parents

Tesco Baby Club – advantages include:

  • Offers specifically aimed for your baby’s age  
  • Told about sales in advance
  • Competitions  

Boots Parenting Club – you need an advantage card to join up. Advantages include:

  • Free Boots magazines
  • 10 advantages points for every £1 spent on baby items (higher than the normal “rate”)
  • The possibility of free gifts
  • Coupons

Continue reading “The Ultimate Money Saving Guide for Parents”

How to stop wasting money on household bills with BillButler

Sometimes we just accept that some things are unavoidable expenses that we can’t save on, especially household bills. You’ll be pleased to know, however, that I’ve found an app that can actually take the stress out of household bill management! So, without further ado, here’s how to stop wasting money on household bills.

The Frugal Frenchie

Introducing BillButler

I have collaborated with BillButler today, to tell you a bit about their app and how you can use it to save you money on future household bills.

BillButler is a service that wants to help you feel less overwhelmed by your bills, as well as making it easier for you to monitor your spending and payment methods. On your dashboard screen, you can view and track all your outgoings (including broadband, TV, phone, water, electricity etc.) so you don’t miss any and to avoid feeling overwhelmed.

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Claim £100s on your work uniform

If you work and pay tax, you could claim £100s on your work uniform! This is a simple, easy guide to show you how you can get started on claiming, as well as back-tracking what you’re owed.

Eligibility requirements

This tax refund is for the washing, repair and potential replacements of your work uniform. You could be refunded up to 5 years worth of expenses!

To be able to do so, the following must apply:

  • You wear a uniform that shows you do a certain job or work for a particular company. You could try for non-branded uniforms, however, it’s important that it is used as uniform only
  • It’s a compulsory part of your job
  • It’s your responsibility to replace uniform, clean it, repair or purchase it. If the employer’s facilities do this for you, you are not eligible for this tax refund
  • You paid income tax for the year or 5 years that you’re claiming for

Claim £100s on your work uniform

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Top 5 money lessons to know before graduating

We don’t learn about money in university, or in younger education at that. It’s sad but it’s true – no one teaches us how to pay taxes, how to budget and what a mortgage is. And yet, money is essential! No matter what career you get into, you’ll be earning a salary and using money to buy food, transport, etc.

So if the schools won’t teach us, we need to teach ourselves. Based on the several months I’ve been working and researching with Financially Mint, here are the top 5 money lessons you need to know before graduating.

Top 5 money lessons to know before graduating

1. Money is just a tool

My life changed when I realised I didn’t have to spend my entire life working for money at a job I didn’t like just to pay the bills and have a roof over my head.

Money is your tool to live how you want. You are the one who chooses what to do with it. If you want to use it to travel the world, that’s on you. If you want to use it on going out every weekend, that’s also on you. It’s about making priorities and deciding what you really want. Once you understand that, you realise that money is just a tool to achieve your goals and dreams; what you really need is willpower and a desire to do better.

And the key to making sure you use your money correctly is financial education – what we’re not taught in schools. Learning how to invest, how to start a side-hustle, how to save money. These are things we need to learn by ourselves, and the more we study them the better we get at it. So get started in college!

2. Invest, invest, invest

The key to growing your wealth: investing.

Investing is stowing away your money somewhere safe and watching it grow. It’s starting off with £500 and seeing it grow to £100,000 over 20 years. It’s what lets people retire early and always have cash for emergencies.

If you don’t want to start investing in college (check my how to get started in uni post), I recommend at least learning the basics and preparing for investing once you graduate. Invest into low fee index funds and put away some money every month. Watch your money grow into something useable for the future: a car, a house, retirement, etc.

Investing is one of the pillars of financial education, so I recommend every student to get started as soon as possible.

Top 5 money lessons to know before graduating

3. Control is key

Control means knowing where your money is and what it’s doing at all times. It means not having a heart attack every time you open your bank account (it happens) and it means knowing where to put your money once you get your paycheck.

This starts with a nice and simple budget. In my 6 day course, that The Frugal Frenchie has reviewed, we go back to the basics of budgeting: allocating your money to the right expenses and making sure you reach your ambitions/goals.

Being in control of your money outflows and inflows before graduating will make your entry into the workforce so much easier. You won’t have a pressure to get a job immediately (Emergency fund to the rescue!), you’ll know what kind of salary you’re looking for and you’ll know exactly where to put your money every month.

4. Don’t be in debt

Debt can good and can be bad. But when it’s bad, it’s pretty bad. The bad debt: credit card debt and payday loans. As a student, you hopefully will have very little debt (student loans are a separate case), and you really want to keep it that way. Credit card debt accumulates and will get more expensive every time – pay off all your debt and make sure you know what you’re doing if you take on any more debt.

Student loans are another story altogether. In fact, they’re so different that some people prefer calling your student loan debt a contribution, simply because the situation is so particular. Before graduating, take a look at your student loans and decide whether you want to pay them off. This post on Should I pay off my student loans? will give you an idea of how to make a decision and plan appropriately. And as always, do your research.  

Top 5 money lessons to know before graduating

5. Pay yourself first

The best part of the budget: yourself.

This means allocating a certain percentage of your income to yourself, to your goals. And you can start this in college: the minute you get your paycheck/loan/money each month, allocate 15% to your goals, to your emergency fund, to your debts. That 15% is what will get you out of the rat race, out of living from paycheck to paycheck.

If you start paying yourself first in college you will actually be prepared for adult life (shock horror). You’ll be way more flexible and really be able to pick the job you want – because you’ll have an emergency fund, you’ll be debt free and will have the motivation to keep working on your goals.

Again, this starts with the mighty budget. At the time of calculating your budget from your income, the first thing you do is allocate that 15% to ‘Savings’. And then the rest is for your expenses! No need to worry about saving up more.

Understanding these 5 lessons on money will get you prepared for the world after graduation. Heck, it’ll even get you excited – you understand that you don’t have to be stuck at a job you just tolerate, you can achieve that flexibility to help you find the job that works best for. It all starts with being in control and financially educated.